Use Design Sharing Platforms

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The problem is…

The creative designs developed by many individuals and groups are not captured in a form so it could be found and re-used by others.

The proposed solution might apply when

people are willing to share their design contributions with others

The solution proposed is…

Organise co-creation workshops where people get to know a range of design sharing platforms, how open/free licensing works and learn to work as part of a community, enabling others to replicate and contribute back to their project.

The expected outcome is…

more people share their designs and become part of a networked co-creation ecosystem.

Other information

Rationale

  • Sharing one's designs requires understanding the ecosystem; it requires one to see that many people make small contributions to a bigger whole, where one builds on top of the work of others, through networked collaboration; to understand how free and open licensing work to share one's work and protect authorship; to understand how to make money and the nature of open source business models.
  • There are many platforms that encourage people to organise in communities and share their designs in the form of a commons. Such platforms generally provide for recognition of authorship, choosing the open or free license of one's choice, to see who or how many people download or reuse a particular design and in general they encourage collaboration.

Significant influencing factors

  • the co-creation workshops can help to go through the various concepts, get to know the existing platforms and study cases of successful open source hardware or open design communities and products.

Evidence/Examples

  • The Open Business Model cases studies of the Digital DIY project have documented 14 cases of open source hardware technologies that demonstrate how viable economy ecosystems can thrive without patenting and with sharing knowledge openly and freely.

Related Patterns

Links to further resources

Authors and Credits

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